Dis/ability Ethnography

 Logo for Argentina's green cane law, which designates people with low vision.

Logo for Argentina's green cane law, which designates people with low vision.

Dis/ability performance and passing has been a focus of my work since 2014. I make performances that investigate that line between "dis" and "abled" by asking performers and audiences to cross it in any direction. In Nobody's Home (2013) the audience spends about ⅓ of the show with their eyes closed. In Alchemy (2014) each performers have no use of eyes, hands, mouth, or body altogether. I perform my solo memoir Cones (2015) blindfolded and the audience also spends part of the show performing things with eyes closed, and since playing Tiresias in Antigone (2016) I've being looking for more work as a typecast visually impaired actor.

Alongside this work has a been a blog called Rods & Cones about the spectrum of vision and blindness in art, media, science and culture. I have also taught classes on the subject at Cornell University, Goddard College, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Above: Sighted actors perform blind characters in The Miracle Worker (1962), The Tale of Zatochi (1962), O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), Daredevil (2015), Star Wars: Rogue One (2016), and the video for Lionel Ritchie's song "Hello" (1984). Whether products of biography, fiction, or fantasy, all are depicted as having extraordinary powers

Asana

Morgan Cobra.jpg

I teach community yoga classes that emphasize an inquisitive approach to breath, anatomy and alignment. I use yoga as a way to unpack ideas in art, science and politics, and relate that to a process of personal transformation and social justice. My classes invite dialogue and often raise funds for activist organizations.

Early morning classes: Tues/Thurs, 7AM

Advancing Asana (workshop-style classes):
6PM Wednesdays and 10AM Sundays

More info at Studio 34 Yoga.

Theatre Pedagogy

 2014 community workshop in Philadelphia

2014 community workshop in Philadelphia

Silent reel of Philadelphia Theatre of the Oppressed workshops led by Hariprasad Kowtha, Paloma Irizarry, and Morgan FitzPatrick Andrews. Filmed and edited by Natasha Cohen-Carroll and Gabriel Dattatreyan.

For the past decade I've taught using the methodologies of Pedagogy and Theatre of the Oppressed (PTO). PTO uses images, sounds, movements and words equally, acknowledging that all are expressed as forms of language in society. PTO's ultimate goal is the dismantling of oppressive dynamics, and each session I facilitate keeps that in the context of what the group can achieve in an a single day, week, month, or semester.

I've run PTO currcula for education programs at Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges, Cabrini University, The College of New Jersey, and Tyler College of Art; for Masters of Social Work students and faculty from Drexel and Widener Universities; in dis/ability studies at Cornell and Temple Universities, and for theatre, dance, and writing classes at UPenn and the University of the Arts.

Performative Lecture

 "The Frankenstein of Everyday Life" performative lecture at the Black Sheep Festival, Pittsburgh, 2006

"The Frankenstein of Everyday Life" performative lecture at the Black Sheep Festival, Pittsburgh, 2006

 "The Moon and Our Future" performative lecture at Rutherfurd Hall, 2012

"The Moon and Our Future" performative lecture at Rutherfurd Hall, 2012

 "Medium Manifesto" performative lecture at for the Alternative Media Confernce, Goddard College, 2013

"Medium Manifesto" performative lecture at for the Alternative Media Confernce, Goddard College, 2013

Performative lectures predate the ages of information and industrialization, harkening back to times when people needed to step outside to hear someone talk about science or history. I use performative objects—pictures, masks, contraptions and household items from everyday life—as conveyances for ideas, often inviting audience members to step into the process. Because of their interdisciplinary and interactive nature, the performative lecture can happen at the theater, on the street, and even in a conventional lecture hall.

Also see Picture Performance: A History